Sunshine collection! Dandelion Sun Balm

When you receive a little bouquet of wilted dandelions, instead of sneaking them into the compost before your gifter notices, pop the heads off and jar them with coconut oil! It can be ingested, used as a sun burn balm, or added to anything!
Lots of happy in these little flowers, they are earth sun shines!

Below is the recipe

  Take your little dandelions, remove the stems (they can be too bitter) and stuff any jar full to the brim with dandelion heads.

Next, warm coconut oil (never over heat!) and pour into the jar until the jar is full to the top with coconut oil.  You can use any other oil like vegetable and olive but I personally find that they have a higher potential to rot quickly. Coconut oil is smooth and as close as I can get to animal fat (which is always the best for our animal bodies).

Let the jar sit in the sun. You can also let it sit on the stove in a pot and warm water with a cloth at the bottom. Slow heat is key!

Once the oil has sat for at least 2 days, it can be rewarmed if needed and the dandelions strained.

I like to warm the oil gently so I can jar it (in little cups that people use for jello shots! Super inexpensive!) to share with friends and others that are in need.

This can be added to food or used to heal the skin of eczema, dry cracked skin, skin that needs more vitamin protection, skin that loves the sun….pretty much everything! Email jazminromaniuk@gmail.com for for info if needed.

Enjoy!

Squirrel cache

Squirrels like to hide little gems of food that they will come back to later. From my time among the trees, I have seen a few squirrel caches filled with all types of mushroom drying. The mushroom below looks like a russula, solid woody-red coloured. More often I have seen the psychedelic Amanita muscaria formosa (miskwedo) hanging in the trees to dry. I wonder if the squirrels are affected in a similar way to humans when ingesting that ancient medicine…

squirrel cache

 

Nimishomis Wigwass: Grandfather Birch

I am making available the work I have done regarding the medicine of the Birch tree. There are associated fungi that live with Wigwass have many medicines that are available to use.

I drew this concept of medicine in a paint document showing that Birch live with Chaga, Polypore shelf fungus and Amanita muscaria variations.

This image is just a concept. The likelihood of finding all fungus within one tree is slim, but if you ever find one please leave me a comment.

Click the link below to get your free copy of Nimishomis Wigwass: Grandfather Birch.

System of Medicine BetulaSp. (2)

Grandfather Birch

Raise your feather

After the ice breaks and melts on Lake of the Woods, the shores become lined with  wood and other detritus. I was so lucky to catch the sight of this beautiful symbol of peace and honour, a white flag made of a gull feather and dried reed.

Peace flag

I would like to raise attention to the reality that Lake of the Woods, it’s plants, it’s animals, the Anishanaabe, the people, live in a land of profound energy!

This energy, the Spirit, is so powerful that the people who reside or vacation here, indigenous and settler alike, experience great fortune or great misery. The fortune is apparent when boating the lake. Many large summer homes and mansions line the shores bringing folks from around the globe to bask in this high energy environment.

The great misery; the alcoholism, the addiction, the racism, the missing Indigenous women and girls underline the fact that

“Something must be done!” Elder Nancy said to me.

Two Anishanaabekwe, indigenous women, gone missing and found to be passed within two months.

This energy must be directed through us by our connection with the land first, not only indigenous people, but all people who visit this place. Secondly, we must forgive ourselves our transgressions so we can move forward with healing and love. The power of this place can be used to heal the nation! This is part of Manitou Ahbee, the place where the Creator sits, the place that houses the birth of the Canadian Shield, our Grandfather protector.

So we raise our feathers for the ancestors and those who have passed. The nature of this lake raises it’s feather for all of us.